September is National Food Safety Month


Food Poisoning (also known as Foodborne illness) is any illness that results from eating contaminated food. The good news – it is preventable.
Let’s look at some current facts and discuss some common food safety myths.
Facts:
  • It is estimated that 1 in 6 people each year will experience food poisoning.
  • About 15% of foodborne outbreaks occur at home.  
  • Following four simple steps CleanSeparateCook, and Chill – can help protect your family from food poisoning.
Food Safety Myths – True or False
Myth 1: Washing raw poultry, meat, and seafood is safe to do at home.
False: Washing raw poultry, meat, and seafood could cause bacteria to spray and may contaminate other foods and kitchen items.  
Solution: Cook your meat, poultry, and/or seafood to the proper temperature – do not wash it.
Myth 2: Putting hot foods in the refrigerator will make the whole refrigerator get too warm.
False: Your refrigerator can take the heat! You want to cool hot foods to a temperature of 40°F or below quickly.
Solution: Divide hot foods into shallow containers that are less than 4 inches tall for quick cooling in the refrigerator.

Myth 3:  Fruits and vegetables with a skin don’t need to be washed before peeling.
False:  Bacteria on the peel or rind can easily transfer to the inside of your fruits and veggies when you cut them.
Solution:  Wash all fruits and vegetables even if you will peel them.
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This institution is an equal opportunity provider. This material was funded by USDA's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – SNAP. The University of Maryland Extension will not discriminate against any person because of race, age, sex, color, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, ancestry or national origin, marital status, genetic information, political affiliation, and gender identity or expression. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can help you buy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more about Maryland’s Food Supplement Program (SNAP), contact the Maryland Department of Human Resources at 1-800-332-6347 or apply online at https://mydhrbenefits.dhr.state.md.us/.
© Eat Smart, Be Fit Maryland!Maira Gall